How Fast Can You Go?

I’ve been following the CalTech and CERN groups responsible for achieving what they claim is the “latest Land Speed Record” of 5.4 Gbps and a claimed throughput of 6.25 Gbps over an average period of 10 minutes, according to the announcement to the Internet 2 newslist on February 24th.

Of course, what does this mean? They claim that “best achieved throughput with Linux is ~5.8Gbps in point to point and 7.2Gbps in single to many configuration”. They claim they’re melting down the “hardware” at 6.6 Gbps. Is this true?

FastTCP and SSC – A Short Meditation

While we’re all oohing and ahhing over CalTech’s FastTCP bulk transfers and record busting using their new TCP congestion control – interesting paper (finally) by Jin/Wei/Low – contrast this with friendly rival Stanford’s protocol high-speed TCP that changes the fairness (I find it interesting and provides some new ideas). Are either likely to impact anyone’s use of the Internet in the next decade, anymore than studying cold fusion?

I’m struck by how all this “record busting” may be a mere sideshow in the scope of real Internet usage, especially given Microsoft Research’s own Jim Gray’s economic arguments against bulk transfers at Stanford a few months back.

Interplanetary TCP

Google put out a lunar job listing, for the person who really needs to get away from people.

So I went and asked Vint Cerf “Perhaps this is the first real use of interplanetary TCP?”. He laughed. I think you will too.

OK, I like Google. Always have I suppose, because it’s minimalist. And I like the logo – it’s kind of simple and childish, but it’s very Stanford. Yes, I know, I went to Berkeley, but my dad and brothers went to Stanford, so even if there’s a rivalry, it’s a friendly one. Besides, usually Berkeley gets the axe to grind – I’ll take a bear over a tree anyday.